Girls-only latrine in Honduras

Education and toilets.

What’s the connection?

Find out in today’s World Toilet Day post:

Humans and human waste don’t mix

Dangerous parasites, microbes and chemicals often make their home in human feces and other wastes. “Sanitation” means preventing humans from coming into contact with wastes, whether they are from humans, animals, farms or industry.

In Canada, we’re lucky that human wastes are disposed of safely through our sewer systems and processing plants. In many other parts of the world, making sure that everyone has a safe system for getting rid of waste is still an important item on the global to-do list.

Did you know? 2.6 billion people in the world don’t have access to clean and proper sanitation.

The impact of toilets for girls

For girls, sanitation is a health and safety issue, but it’s also more personal than that: it’s about privacy and comfort. Did you know that a lack of girls-only bathrooms is one of the main reasons adolescent girls in the developing world stop attending school? For teenage girls privacy is essential – bathrooms for girls make a school a more welcoming and safe place and that helps girls stay in school to pursue their dreams.

Giving girls access to toilets can help keep them in school by keeping them healthy. Keeping healthy means fewer sick days. Proper sanitation, combined with good hygiene, is what it takes to prevent illnesses like diarrhea. With good sanitation, girls are less likely to pass on waterborne diseases to their younger brothers and sisters, helping them to keep out of harm’s way.

Want to do something about it? Give the gift of a ‘girls-only latrine‘ and help girls in developing countries stay in school and stay healthy.

 

2 Comments

 

  1. Pingback : Changing The Lives Of Girls, One Issue At A Time « Because I am a Girl Blog

  2. Pingback : Monthly Focus: Girls, Water and the Environment « Because I am a Girl Blog

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